Jujube in zone 5


#102

I tried (and killed) a few fig trees before I stumbled on a cultivar that produces on last year’s wood, Then then learned how to protect it (outside) for our long and cold winters in Mtl.
Unfortunately, the fig tree I have was a gift, and I do not know the cultivar’s name.
This picture was taken on August 11th.


#103

I guess that we can easily grow figs up here as long as twe work a little to unearth it and protect it for the rwinter, and then replant it in spring. We have to find a cultivar that produces figs on last year’s wood. We’ll never be able to bring figs that appear on the current year’s wood to maturity unless we we bring the tree in a heated basement or greenhouse…
Here is how I protect my fig tree (see picture)
BTW, my jujubes are right beside my fig tree :slight_smile:


#104

it truly is. It isn’t just impressive, but also borders on absurd-- that jujus are capable of bearing fruits on that side of canada, so whatever @CQFD is doing is ground-breaking.
the longer daylight hours does help, as the long dormancy periods can starve jujus, since the species has a tendency to leaf out late relative to other fruit trees, even in vegas… Have to say though that the longer daylight hours in canada/alaska are more advantageous to growing sun-loving annuals that mature within two to three months(tomatoes, okra, eggplant etc), since annuals are treated as disposable specimens, whereas perennials are subject to periods of ‘leaflessness’, hence zero ability to photosynthesize


#105

Wow. Amazing work!


#106

Actually, I am getting the ideas from what the French did a few hundreds years ago, to grow peaches near Paris.
They built heavy stone walls and grew peach trees and other fruit trees right next to them (see picture).
This created micro-climates that helped them grow fruits 1 or 2 zones further north.
Our Montreal Italian community developed the technique to winter protect and grow fig trees up here.
Let’s face it… I love gardening… I’m curious and I never tasted a jujube or a pawpaw. They are not available up here… so I may as well try to grow them :wink:


#107

really awesome. Incidentally, where did you obtain your juju trees from? And how much does it cost, if you don’t mind me asking?


#108

incidentally, pawpaw should be easy, i mean, you got your juju to fruit, so pawpaws are a piece of cake


#109

I paid about $35 USD ($50 CAD) each. I found them in a garden center by luck ! First time I saw jujubes up here :slight_smile:


#110

I have 7 pawpaw trees here (3 ft to 5 ft tall). They do well with no special winter protection. I’ve had them for 6 or 7 years. They have not fruited yet.


#111

that is a good price, actually.

wow, your accounts sure are full of surprises and contrasts! One would easily surmise pawpaws are easier to get to fruit there than jujus. Don’t give up on those pawpaws though, they are yummy!


#112

Great pic and illustration of a neat concept. Exciting stuff no doubt.


#113

I’m about 15 minutes outside of Windsor, Ontario (US side) (or about 3-4 miles as the crow flies)

My biggest jujube problem isn’t a lack of warmth, 90%+ of my fruit ripens (as estimated over the past 5-6 years). Fruit set is my problem. Lack of pollination is unlikely as I have 4 different trees within my 1/8th acre yard.

Pawpaws are ripening rite now. I’ve had 3-4 and probably have another 20-30 hanging.

Welcome to the forum. It’s excellent having another northern explorer joining us.

Scott

Btw…those bell shaped jujus earlier in the thread look so cool…


#114


Well… after a year’s work and hopes, I tasted my first jujube today. It had started softening.
It was a little bit sweet and crunchy, but it’s really not where I hoped it would be.
Next spring, I will try to give my 2 trees more heat early in the season, to wake them up earlier so they hopefully will have more time to mature their fruits.
That’s what makes gardening interesting. There’s always next year :wink:


#115

that was picked too soon, hence the far-from-stellar quality. The aim is to keep them on the tree until they start having some tan patches, or totally tan, if possible. I see your tree is still quite young, but now that it has some laterals, it should bear fruits sooner next year, and hopefully not get caught by cold weather.


#116

Many thanks :slight_smile:
We’re now down to 60s (F) daytime and high 40s/low 50s (F) at night.
There’s always next year :wink:
But so far so good. I kept them alive last winter (-20F), and they fruited this summer.
Back to making sure they stay alive this winter and more sun and warmth next summer :slight_smile:
Chers,
Richard


#117

That’s it for 2018. There will be a light frost early tomorrow morning in Montreal, so I picked my remaining jujubes.
So far so good. They survived last winter (-29C/-20F), and then flowered and produced a few fruits this summer.
Jujube taste was not great, but not bad (a bit sweet).
I will still keep my 2 li shrubs in containers and protect them again for this winter. Next spring, they will get much better heat and sun conditions. :slight_smile:
Cross my fingers


#118

Hi IL847,

I live in San Jose, do you mind PM me the lady contact? I would like to buy some from her. thanks a lot.


#119

she is at gilroy. I am not sure still have her contact info on file. I will try to find it, but may take longer than expected


#121

Have her WeChat contact info. just don’t know how to send it to you


#122

How great! Thank you!