Jujubes- Our New Adventure


#1822

glad massandra remained that way for you. The serial 112F days here rendered ours styrofoamy and dry. First time happened to our massandra here


#1823

I have visited Massandra 10 years ago and there were no jujubes growing around but a huge winery set up for the tourists. In the courtyard several trees were growing, mostly persimmon but one of them might have been a jujube. So I am wondering if any of the american tourists incidentally took some wood with them and made it a new variety.


#1824

I ate a few Sugarcane jujube fruits today and they were definitely had a bitter taste in the skin. So HJ is more Superior.


#1825

Yes, that isn’t bad growth from last year. My biggest seedling is about 3’ tall. And it was planted in 2018, so it is about 1 foot per year…

I’ve never noticed a bitter taste from Sugar Cane. I’ve had a few so far this year, but they are just getting ready to start. I wonder if it is our climates that make the difference, or our taste buds. Maybe you are detecting something that I’m not. The reverse often happens with my wife. As someone who doesn’t eat any spices whatsoever (other than salt, sugar, and occasionally cinnamon), I’m pretty good at detecting any off flavors, which may be why I like very few foods. Or it could be a difference in the soil or weather. Anyone on the East coast had a bitter Sugar Cane?

Here is one of the first ones ripe. At the bottom of the pic, you can see one which cracked and a YJ has discovered. A few have cracks, but they mostly seem OK. I also ate one of them earlier today just to make sure :slight_smile:

edit: I ate a cracked fruit…not a YJ…

The Bok Jo and Tae Sang Wang on the same tree don’t have any cracks. Probably because they are a couple weeks from ripening. At least the BJ is- I don’t know when TSW will ripen.


#1826

Here’s a case study in how important water is to jujubes. I was mowing the lawn at a property today and stopped to consider just how little the jujue’s there have grown.

I planted 6 in the front yard in March/April 2018. Of those, 2 struggled through the first year, one only leafing out in September. I replaced one of the 2 (and potted it up) with a Autumn Beauty from JFaE late that fall.

When I did so, I noticed that the soil was very dry, even a few hours after it rained. So, I dug a slightly bigger hole and mixed some compost into it, around the rootball from the potted tree (JFaE sends ~3 gal pots).

Fast forward 2 years and the AB is still at 4’ and has a couple small fruits. The 2nd struggling tree which I didn’t replace never came back the next spring. Of the other 4 trees, 3 are still there and about 4’ tall, with no fruit. One died to the rootstock this past winter and is growing back from the roots (slowly).

This summer I started putting leaf mulch around the trees every month or so, in hopes of improving the soil. In the past, I would add woodchips annually.

The area around the first tree was decorated by tenants. The maple you see in the background of the pic is to the North. These trees get almost all day sun, minus a bit in the late afternoon, when the sun goes behind the house.

Small Autumn Beauty fruit:

In the backyard of the same house, I put a single Sugar Cane. This one doesn’t get as much sun, but has grown better and is now over 6’ Note that it is near the fence where I blow the leaves each fall (keeps from having to edge along the fence…). I’m guessing that the extra moisture from the rotting leaves has helped it grow a bit better.

Contrast this with the growth I’ve gotten at another property, which was planted a year later in spring 2019. The 3 jujus in the front yard there are already 8-12’ tall (the Contorted is the only one under 10’). Not only is the soil nicer there, but the ground is pitched at an angle where all the rain from the street runs into the front yard. According to the neighbor, during heavy rains there is a storm-sewer drainage problem and there is small river between our two properties (the yard is pitched well enough that I haven’t noticed it in the basement).

The Honey Jar at the property with more water (over 10’ before I pruned it recently):

So plenty of water is the difference between 4’ tall and no fruit in 3 years (and 43% mortality) and 10’+ tall with fruit after just 2 years. Sun-wise, both are similar. In terms of the soil, it is hard to say if the 2nd is just better, or better because of all the rain.

A few more pics of the fast growing ones:

So (the smallest of the 3 at 7-8’, still has some fruit in year #2):


#1827

Dr Yao posted this on Facebook


#1828

I went out and tried a few Sugar Cane this morning. Some with total brown, others with partial brown. All tasted good. Not a hint of bitterness. Agree with @BobVance that climate has to play a role in it.

We don’t have intense heat in the summer.

Thanks, @k8tpayaso for posting Dr. Yao’s Statements. I don’t let my jujubes (or other fruit trees) getting very thirsty. They appear happy.


#1829

All my jujube trees are grown in the sprinkler zones so they got watered every other day. Maybe age, sunny days, and water helped with production.


#1830

Our productive trees get watered as much, or should i say-- as little, as professor Yao’s productive trees. The specimens i have that get less water, they do get runty and obviously not productive especially those planted in little cans.


#1831

Like @BobVance has experienced, Shanxi Li dropped fruit at a higher rate than HJ or Sugar Cane.

I think I can understand when young fruit drop but when more mature fruit also dropped, it is frustrating.

In this pic, the jujube at the bottom next to a quarter was Sugar Cane. It did not dropped. I picked it for a size comparison.

The rest were Shanxi Li at various sizes, all dropped.

Sugar Cane and HJ can be eaten when partially brown like that. Shanxi Li was tasteless in the stage.


#1832

Honey Jar fruits are awesome. 3 gallon bags are in the freezer already.


#1833

bumper crops in nebraska!


#1834

True, though I haven’t seen much drop recently. The big ones seem to be hanging on pretty well.

Today, I picked the first Mango Dong (WInter Delight) from JFaE. The fruit is huge:

I know you were worried about Winter Delight not being ready in time, but it seems to be fine. Only a few of my Sugar Canes have ripened so far, so Mango Dong/Winter Delight (at least the one from JFaE) looks to be an early/mid season cultivar.

I may have picked this a few days early, as the brix was only 18.5, with a mild flavor. It had good crunch, but wasn’t overly juicy. I’ll let the next one go a bit longer and see how it gets. The tree is both precocious and productive, with it holding more than a dozen additional fruit, in only year #2. The tree is basically a 6’ stick.

Here’s a size comparison against one of the large Shanxi Li.


#1835

That is a big jujujbe. I agree that if it ripens for you now, it should be fine for me. So far, only my SC is ripening now. A stretch of cool weather we are having these days do not help,either.


#1836

Here is my Winter Delight from OGW. This photo was taken in November a few years ago. They do not look the same as yours.

It looks like my Autumn Beauty, also from OGW.


#1837

Winter Delight is pretty confusing. I’ve also got Autumn Beauty from JFaE, so it will be interesting to see how similar the fruit is to the “Mang Dong”. This year, there is only 1 fruit on the Autumn Beauty though, so I may need to wait another year for more clarity.

And the Winter Delight I have from OGW and BR are too small to bear anything yet. Maybe OGW will be ready in a year or two, but I’m actually going to dig up the BR one from the rental where rabbits(?) have been setting it back (it’s only a foot or 2 tall…).

It looks like both varieties produced some large fruit for you. Was the WD much later season than the AB? This is pretty early in my season, so that may be another clue.

Here’s a pic of more Mango Dong coming from the JFaE tree, which has a few more starting to color up.


#1838

Agree that the true identity of WD is confusing.

Anyway, my Massandra are ripening.


#1839

I’ve read everywhere that Jujubes require no spraying. So this spring I didn’t spray my jujube when I sprayed everything else. Jujube tree kind of stopped growing but looked healthy. I couldn’t find any bugs. Somebody here mentioned that it could be grasshoppers. I sprayed spinosad after that and the tree put on about a foot of growth since then. So Now I know I need to spray it next year. Hopefully I will have fruit next year.


#1840

AB is ready in August (usually between August 7 and 14) continuing into September. WD is ready in late October or early November, continuing into December.

I don’t think it’s too complicated. At some point OGW got the two cultivars mixed up and that mix-up has been perpetuated by others.


#1841

I’m guessing those dates are for CA. I don’t have any jujube which ripen in August here.

So it seems likely that the Winter Delight/Mango Dong from JFaE is actually AB? I also have an AB from them with one fruit on it. I’ll pick one from each when it is ripe, but on first glance they are similar.

Any idea if the Dong/Winter from Chinese Red Date is the same as Winter Delight? Or is “Winter” a different variety?

I don’t think there are any insects which cause jujube to not grow. At least, I haven’t seen any here. I think it is likelier that it put on the growth because it either got some fertilizer, water, or sunny weather. Or likely all 3. When I first started, I got very little growth before I started watering and fertilizing (hard to control the sun…). This year I got much better growth, at least in the ones that I was able to water. The ones which got fertilizer without water still didn’t do much.

In future plantings, I’m planning to incorporate more organic material into the surrounding soil to help with water retention.

Looks good! How do they taste? I have ~6 on the tree, but none are ripe yet. It was a 1 gal potted tree from Burnt Ridge in 2018, and it finally sized up this year, reaching 5-6’ tall. That is actually pretty quick for one of the small trees, as I have some from OGW in fall 2015 which are still smaller.