News on heirloom apples

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He actually sent me two of them, Gold Ridge and and an old Arkansas variety Givens, aka Arkansas Baptist.

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Is there a full list of all ten varieties they discovered?

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Streaked Pippin

Found: Waitsburg, Washington

Gold Ridge

Found: Pomeroy, Washington

Sary Sinap (ancient apple from Turkey)

Found: Latah County, Idaho

Butter Sweet (of Pennsylvania)

Found: Latah County, Idaho

Colman

Found: Latah County, Idaho

Claribel

Found: Latah County, Idaho

Milalfyi

Found: Pullman, Washington

Nelson Sweet

Found: Seattle, Washington

Fink

Found: Boise, Idaho

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That is wonderful news! I initially thought this was an article about the first group of apples rediscovered. I look forward to learning more details about these.

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I found an ancient apple tree on Cape Cod, behind the Penniman House, that had white apples. Totally beautiful. And they tasted great. In early March (just before the lockdown) I drove up there and took some scion cuttings. On April 4 I began grafting, using a “grafting machine,” bought on Amazon, that cuts the male and female sections. I then used the thin, see-through grafting tape to cover the grafts, and covered the tape with black grafting compound. It’s now been 12 days…with no signs of growth from the scions. I did five graftings to rootstocks and five on branches of the apple tree on my front lawn. Having never done this before, with only videos and such to rely on, I’m getting increasingly worried that all my work was for naught…

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The key to grafting success is having cambium of the scionwood and the rootstock contacted well/tightly at the graft union, Not sure if your grafting machine was able to create such contact.

Have you watched grafting viedos of Stephen Haynes or Skilcult. Those are easy to understand and follow.

@Johnthecook lives on the Cape. Maybe, you will get to know him and he can show you grafting techniques.

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I sure hope it works! Sounds very worthwhile. Be patient, though. If they don’t dry out they make be OK for weeks.

Well now I have to get some next year😃

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I noticed that is only 9. I’m guessing Givens is the 10th, though not sure why it was left off the list.

Patience. There’s still time.

DanHurley,

At 12 days(now 15) I’d be looking to see if the grafted scion was still alive, showing a healthy color and no striation like puckering of the scion wood (that indicates drying up and failure). I’ve never used black grafting compound but I’d guess it would be hard to scrape it back, in a spot, to check out the scion wood color and to see if any buds are pushing out. Since I use parafilm wrapped over a tightly rubber banded whip graft, for me it’s easy to unwrap some of the parafilm to look at the scionwood. If your grafting machine makes an omega cut (u-shaped), and since you didn’t mention a tight wrapping, the graft will probably be weak at this point and you have to be careful handling it.

At 14 days I’m happy just to see that the grafted scion is alive, and any sign of growth would be quite a bonus. I usually wait 21 days before I remove the parafilm. In the past I’ve had grafts that didn’t grow for months, and then grew feebly and I’ve seen some that stayed alive without any growth for a much longer period. I’m not sure what controls this, but it probably depends on the scion compatibility, the quality of the graft, the type of graft, the timing of the grafting, the current weather, the variety of the scion and the rootstock. This was more a problem years ago when I was learning to graft, and is much less of a problem now.

I think the best advice I’ve read, probably on this forum, was to make your grafts when the tree is just starting to push new growth in the spring.

@WildForager says when the leaves are the size of a squirrel’s ear.

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Found it

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How’s it going? I want to get some next year.

You sent me on a journey today. I went behind the historic house and searched, but couldn’t find the tree. So I drove to the town over to talk to the national seashore personnel, but they’d never heard of it before. So I left and drove back to the home. I took a walk and finally found an old tree that had been blown over. I hope it’s the right one😁it was still alive and I found some limbs that weren’t growing out yet and cut some limbs off.

John,
I can’t recall who told us about that tree. Hope it is the right one. I hope to hear about its fruit from you in 2-3 years from now.

I just tried to get you out of the house for fresh air. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Tippy

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Dan I commented here. Is this the tree?

Is there any way I can get a scion or two from those?