No Spray Apple List

Sorry, the title is click bait. No spray apples do not exist. I went looking for this topic on the forum and no one has done one. Scott had a limited list of only 5.

I would like to start a list of just the overall easiest apples to grow. Apples that can stand up to a low or no spray program and still produce some quality apples. Just name it and if no one disagrees with it I will add it to the below list.

APPLES: Overall easiest to grow-(Insect and disease excluding fire blight)
1-Fuji
2-Gala
3-Mutsu
4-Liberty
5-Pristine
6-Williams Pride
7-King David
8-Arkansas Black
9-Redfield
10-Enterprise
11-Yellow Transparent
12-Hauer Pippin
13-Black Limbertwig
14-Roxbury Russet
15-Early McIntosh
16-Akane
17-Hudson Golden

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for northern zones its liberty, pristine and williams pride.

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Please come and tell my Gala that it’s supposed to be easy to grow without any spray. The apples on that tree are really spotty. :slight_smile: My Liberty did decent with no spray this year. It’s in the same area of the property as the Gala.

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could you state what sort of spray you would like to avoid? I imagine chemical insecticides but what about horticultural oils? Fungicides?

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Just low or no spray. Most people will have problems exclusive to their part of the country.

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Let’s add
‘King David’

…and probably Arkansas Black, Redfield, { and Querina/Florina if you don’t have cedar apple rust problem }.

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Liberty has been a worm magnet for me at times, but I guess I’m growing high protein apples :slight_smile: I like to think that the liberty are a worm trap to keep the other apples clean…so my experiences with other apples might be skewed because liberty steals all the worms. That and Freedom nearby has been a worm magnet too. I agree with pristine on the list. Enterprise is usually clean for me too. Not so sure about william’s pride.

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There is an apple tree on the side of the turnpike I’ve been eyeing up for a few weeks now. I’ll report back if they look as good up close as they do from far away. It’s surrounded by Japanese knotweed so I imagine nobody has sprayed it… :joy:

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Does Hauer Pippin or white winter pearmain qualify for the list?

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I have summer Rambo and I can ASURE you it is NOT on the list.

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Look at this list for disease resistance to scab, fireblight, powdery mildew and cedar apple rust:

For resistance to Summer rots which are usually not well documented look at this thread for two lists of apples resistance to Summer rots:

No apples really have resistance to insects unfortunately.

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Pri apples like some of the best for overall resistance are Enterprise, Sundance, Juliet. Also Novamac and Freedom get good points for resistance.

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Around here, bugs don’t bother yellow transparent or pristine much at all. Your mileage may vary.

…actually enterprise might be somewhat in that category with the thicker skin but I don’t have enough experience on it yet…but early results were promising.

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Agree on Hauer Pippin-it qualifies here. So does Black Limbertwig although here it has no taste to speak of. Other rarities known for no spray per David Vernon I believe: Little Benny and Mattamuskeet although I don’t grow them. I bet Scott would include Hunge from his experience.

I’m still trialing Belle de Boskoop, a robust Dutch triploid russet, crisp with fabulous intense sweet/tart taste, and it’s a strong candidate for no spray list. Also Paducah fall apple and Keener Seedling. I grow both literally surrounded by thousands of red cedars and bradford pear blight carriers at a friend’s no-spray organic farm- Keener is super late, full russet, bulletproof no spray.

After you have the list would be fun to vote on best tasting even though tastes vary- some stars might stand out. Although few, if any members here probably have tasted the rarities I mention.

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As you say, people’s experiences are going to vary depending on where they are, but in my part of the country (Western Massachusetts), apple trees definitely will grow and produce without spray. It’s pretty common to find big old apple trees at old farms and farm sites, and I can think of a number of such trees just around our neighborhood. While some of these trees may be in a somewhat sad state, others appear to be pretty healthy and produce pretty heavily in spite of receiving no apparent care and even in some cases being in subpar locations. Now of course, neither the trees nor the fruit are likely to be pristine, and there may be a certain amount of “added protein”, but in my experience there are a good number of sound ones, too. With a cider press and appropriately managed expectations, I think you could make out tolerably well.

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Are wormy apples OK for cider?

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A little extra protein never hurts!

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I have Enterprise and it’s attacked by plum curculio. This year it had more damage than my Winecrisp. I think in many cases what people see is “escape” rather than resistance. If for some reason a tree is not attacked it’s assumed that it has resistance when in many cases it’s just luck (escape).

There is an old paper that measured fireblight resistance in a large collection of apple cultivars in New York. In many cases there was only one tree of a particular cultivar in the collection. The author warned that when there was only one tree you have to be careful interpreting results. If the one tree had no damage it may have escaped attack rather than having high resistance. The author preferred to see light damage because then you knew the tree was attacked and it had a high level of resistance.

If your apples are all free of a certain disease that doesn’t mean they are resistant. It could be the disease isn’t present or the conditions don’t favor the disease in your area or that particular year. On the other hand if you have many trees covered with scab and one or two trees that are free of scab then the trees free of scab are probably resistant.

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A few ppm (parts per million) of mouse droppings are permitted in Government inspected food…so I imgine a little juice from a critter passes inspection too!

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So in other words codling moth worms don’t hurt the quality of the cider. I guess they’d be a tiny percentage of total volume.