Ranking of varieties of cherries, only "high quality" varieties

@Jose-Albacete

Hi Jose,

I plan to plant 3 more cherry trees.

Ultimately I have room for 5 cherry trees. I actually chose 2 varieties already. 1th tree is planned to be Garrn’s Bunte and the second will be Grafenburger Frühkirsche, both heirloom varieties, both reasonably early and tasty. Garrn’s Bunte will be too small for your liking but it is well adapted to my climate and tasty. Grafenburger Frühkirsche for an early cherry is not too small (25 mm) and quite crunchy. It is said to be very tasty (for an early cherry that is). I do think from a commercial point of view those 2 varieties probably cannot compete with the varieties you recommend. But I do like the variety in my orchard and would like to test and compare heirloom varieties too.

I am very open to and would be thankful for your suggestions.

BR

I tend to agree. Now, I am writing from the position of having every fruit in my garden consumed by critters this year. I harvested about a dozen very early raspberries, and the next day the squirrels and chipmunks worked together to chew holes in my netting, and I got not more raspberries. I haven’t had a strawberry for years. Squirrels stripped every apple from my tree long before they were ripe. Something (I didn’t see it in action) removed every baby apricot. Blueberries disappeared just prior to ripening. My red currants were completely stripped, despite netting. Even the crandall currants and the cornus mas were completely stripped.

And my scallions and some ornamental plants I put in were eaten to the ground.

So I am mostly concerned with critter pressure. And I’ve harvested some of all those things I’ve mentioned in some years. But I’ve eaten exactly one home-grown cherry, and that’s from a Carmine Jewel that is completely encased in a hardware cloth cage. (with a window-screen “door” I can open to let the bees in.)

Nothing attracts the critters more than cherries.
And the fruit of sweet cherries tends to grow up where it’s hard to reach, too.

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Cornell worked for years on varieties that will do well in the northeast, and for commercial growers here they work reasonably well, especially for growers further inland that get less summer rain. Also, commercial growers almost always have dawn to dusk sun which is extremely helpful to prevent blossom and fruit rot.

It does no good to imagine varieties that we have no access to, but I suspect that the breeders at Cornell looked at European varieties- although there could be some new ones that came up after Cornell closed shop. I will just have to wait for them to become available to see what they can do.

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Hi Ginda, I fully understand your anger and disappointment, but you must learn from your problems in order to solve them.
In the first place I will tell you and everyone in general that fruit growing has its guidelines, and you have to follow them to have a good harvest, because if nothing is done (method
Masanobu Fukuoka) I assure you that you will not reap anything decent.

I am going to show you only some photographs of some of my fruit varieties (very few, since I do not want to extend myself in photographs of my fruit varieties , since this post does not deal with that subject).

alba

Well, to have fruit like this, you have to proactively fight against diseases and pests (both insects and animals), always doing it in the most ecological way possible.

First of all, it is essential to do a good winter treatment with copper oxychloride and paraffin oil, to start the campaign free from fungal diseases and harmful insects.
If this is done correctly, the battle is practically won.

Secondly, in case of having harmful vermin (you have squirrels, and I have a plague of rabbits in my region), then it must be solved.
All my trees have plastic protectors on the trunks, so that the rabbits cannot gnaw the trees, and I have two ferrets to hunt the rabbits (every three months we kill about 200 rabbits in my orchard ).
Some end up like this.

conejos

conejo%20frito

The rabbits are delicious in paella with snails (also from my orchard ), and the remaining rabbits, we donate them to charity organization " Caritas " , for the charity (to prepare food for the poor and disadvantaged people)

In other words, the necessary measures must be taken, if nothing is done, nothing will be harvested.

Ginda, you have to see what your problems are, for address them and solve them.

Alan, without going any further, the cherries in the Pearl series (Ebony, Burgundy, Black and Radiance) are from the Cornell University program and they are fantastic.
I really wanted to have these varieties of cherries in my orchard and this spring I am going to graft them.

Regards
Jose

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I was raised in CA where I first grew fruit. I assure you that growing fruit in a Mediterranean climate does not prepare you for the challenges of growing fruit in a humid region. You are lucky, in CA we have ground squirrel and rabbits (along with raccoons and deer), but the ground squirrel are by far the worst. Also gophers that just love to destroy fruit trees from the roots. They require constant trapping or barriers that completely surround the roots. That said, it was much, much easier to grow and harvest fruit there than in the NE.

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What’s your opinion,Jose?Will it work?
I was looking around online and found this recipe for an insecticide.One of the choices for ingredients is white mineral oil,which is basically paraffinic.Then a little more searching,a food grade version was found,which costs about 2-3 times less than JMS.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/white-oil-insecticide.htm

amazon.com

Amazon.com: UltraPro Food Grade Mineral Oil, 1 Gallon (128oz), for Lubricating and Protecting Cutting Board, Butcher Block, Stainless Steel, Knife, Tool, Machine and Equipment, NSF Approved: Industrial & Scientific

Jose,
I don’t imagine people living in a dry, arid climate like CA and where you to fully understand how much harder for us in a humid area like the east coast to grow stone fruit.

As for sweet cherries, I am willing to bet that many of your “crack resistant” cherry varieties would not hold up well in the east coast where we have rain in the spring, summer and fall. Besides cracking, brown rot and canker will show up in droves, too.

I have posted this article from UMass Extension notes a couple of times. It is worth mentioning it again since John Clement wrote about the Pearl series. It looked like the crack resistance is not as good as advertised with rain we have here.

http://umassfruitnotes.com/v77n1/a1.pdf.

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Squirrels are considered a game animal, and the legal season to hunt them (and rabbits) is short. I can kill them when they are actively destroying my property, but not proactively.

I’m considering purchasing a bb gun, to shoot them while they are in the berry bushes. But while that is legal, it might not be socially acceptable. My mother, husband, and daughter are all unhappy with the idea. Also, squirrels are not very tasty, and not commonly eaten here, and I don’t believe anyone would accept a donation of squirrel meat in my area.

Chipmunks are legally vermin, and I can trap them. Well, it’s legal. I’ve had no success when I’ve tried.

I can protect my plants from birds and rabbits with barriers. And the deer mostly stay away from the house.

I used to have outdoor cats, which helped, but that’s getting harder to do.

Anyway, i am enjoying your photos of fruit, and i apologize for being negative. But cherries are known as the fruit that’s hardest to protect from critters around here.

I am intrigued by the wealth of cherry varieties discussed in this thread. My supermarket just sells “cherries”, or “Rainier cherries”, or rarely “Bing cherries”.

I agree with @Jose-Albacete in generally preferring firm cherries over soft cherries. But once, while living in New Jersey, i came across a windfall of black cherries. The fruit is soft and thin and not very sweet. But oh my God, what flavor! I ate all I could find. And i do like the soft, sour pie cherries. They are just a different experience from sweet cherries.

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How does one trap chipmunks without getting squirrels?

No spray no fruit.

Murky I think most people don’t want to find out how to answer your question. Wink

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I trap chipmunks with rat traps placed under trays. They don’t kill squirrels, but if you have a lot of squirrels they will take the bait and snap the traps shut. The trays are to stop birds from getting killed. I have to control chipmunks every season. I have a blueberry house with 1" chicken wire that chips can squeeze through. Those rat traps I don’t have to put under trays. Every year I kill about 20 chipmunks in there along with even more mice. I set two mouse traps for every rat trap just to keep a few traps active at any given time.

Except for the very end of last season that was a decade high squirrel infestation, I managed to control my squirrel population with squirrelinator traps, leading them in with sunflower seeds to peanut and seed cups in the traps. The hard part was stopping small birds from taking the bait from inside the traps, but I figured out how to prevent that by using small clear plastic containers to hold the bait and putting a flat rock above the containers on top of traps in a way that stopped the birds from reaching them. There wasn’t enough room between the containers and the top of the cage and the rock stopped them from reaching the bait from directly above it.

I killed about 60 squirrels, but the process is time consuming and the final crop probably wasn’t worth all the carnage. I also killed about 30 raccoons. I was only protecting apples as frost had destroyed my stonefruit, pears and early flowering apples. It was my worst season in terms of bang for the buck in 30 years.

By paraffin oil, I think he is referring to plain kerosene or number one diesel oil.

Hello, by paraffin oil for agricultural use, I mean exactly this product, this one you see is from the company Sipcam, but there are a lot of manufacturers of identical products.

I don’t find many manufacturers of this “absolutely must-have and green” product in America.

I have seen two valid products

Stark Bro’s sale this product.

And another also similar

I just can’t understand how you can grow fruit without doing winter treatments with copper oxychloride and paraffin oil.
If you do not know how to do the treatments, tell me and I will explain you it to you in detail.
Logically it is not surprising that all of you have diseases and pests of harmful insects.

Regards
Jose

Okay thanks,I do have this product.

Jose-

Why do think that dormant oil and copper is that useful? The oil helps with mites and insects that lay eggs on the trees themselves and that’s it. Copper is used to help with canker although studies have shown there are resistant strains of canker that are immune to copper.

The fact that you think that these are must do sprays just demonstrates that you live in an arid region and have little disease and insect pressure. And you have no real understanding of what high disease and insect pressure is. In your area you can do nothing and still get a decent crop. It’s the same thing in California.

Most of the members of this forum don’t live in arid regions and if they have sweet cherries they have a regular spray schedule. At least they have a spray schedule if they want a crop they can eat.

Brown rot is everywhere and a constant problem. To control it spraying captan or if you can get it-Indar is necessary. As far as insects, the cherry fruit fly, SWD, plum curculio, and Japanese beetle are common. Cherry growers spray insecticide to control these after petal fall. None of these problems are controlled by oil or copper.

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And don’t forget stink bugs. Yes, Jose’s stance as a guru of all growing conditions is a bit of a stretch, but it is human nature to assume that ones victories can be duplicated by all who follow your advice. It is loving to want to be helpful.

The fact is that even a couple of miles from me, animals behave differently. I have a client not 5 miles from me who has bucks standing on their legs to get fruit and leaves- up to 7’ high, while my deer don’t reach up past 4’. On one site black knot will be extremely difficult to control requiring surgery 3-4 times during the growing season to keep it in check while in seemingly similar conditions it is a very minor problem.

I have a stink bug problem but many nearby clients don’t. I have bad OFM and for many of my clients it isn’t a concern. Peach leaf curl was so bad by the ocean this year it was unbelievable- the trees turned red in spring and yet I didn’t see any at any of the other scores of orchards I manage a little ways inland.

In S. CA I never needed to use any pesticide, unless you consider lethal gopher traps pesticide.

I didn’t have to spray oil there either. At most sites I don’t even need to spray it here so I totally agree with you on that. If mites or scale are a problem you can add it to the program.

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mroot said:

Why do think that dormant oil and copper is that useful? The oil helps with mites and insects that lay eggs on the trees themselves and that’s it. Copper is used to help with canker although studies have shown there are resistant strains of canker that are immune to copper.

This is absolutely false.
Indeed, paraffin oil has an insecitic, ovicidal and larvicidal function by suffocation, so that when we start the campaign in spring, the orchard is free of harmful insects, and we will only have to treat with chemical insecticide in the event of a plague appear ( from out of our orchard ) that we will detect early which will be easily manageable.
Copper Oxychlorurium in a dormant state of the trees , is one of the most powerful fungicides that exist, it has systemic activity (penetrates inside the plant) eliminating the spores of fungi during its winter phase, and also has a powerful bactericidal action, so we will start the campaign in spring free of fungal spores in our trees, so if there is any fungal incidence,( that it will come from outside our garden ) we will detect it early, and we will act against it very easily.

The fact that you think that these are must do sprays just demonstrates that you live in an arid region and have little disease and insect pressure. And you have no real understanding of what high disease and insect pressure is. In your area you can do nothing and still get a decent crop. It’s the same thing in California.

It is still false.
If we want to have a healthy orchard and good harvests , the winter treatment is a “MANDATORY” work in our orchards.
This treatment is carried out in the orchards of the North, South, East, and West.
If it is not carried out, it will be “the chronicle of an announced death.”
It does not matter the region of the world where the orchard is.
If we want to be successful with the harvest, this treatment must be done “YES or YES”, in California (what a mania you have whit the Californians), or in La Conchinchina.
Moreover, in humid climates it is much more important than in dry climates, due to the ease of transmission of fungi in humid environments.
This means that in more arid regions, only perform one or two winter treatments, while in humid regions, it is imperative to make three applications.
It is not that I am making it up, it is a fact and a common practice worldwide

Most of the members of this forum don’t live in arid regions and if they have sweet cherries they have a regular spray schedule. At least they have a spray schedule if they want a crop they can eat.

I love this paragraph hahahahahaha
And if the other members of the forum are thrown into a well, you also throw yourself inside (I love your criteria).
The application of chemical fungicides is the last line of defense, which we must try not to reach, for this reason preventive treatments are carried out in winter, since as I have repeated before, if any incidence appears, it will be a lower incidence , and we will be able to attack in time with chemical fungicides with infinite more efficiency

Brown rot is everywhere and a constant problem. To control it spraying captan or if you can get it-Indar is necessary.

My mother hahahahahaha
Brown rot is a fungal disease produced by a group of fungi from the family “Monilinia spp.”, Absolutely easy to control.
In the first place, for this fungal disease the winter treatment is “mandatory”, and eliminates the incidence of the problem in more than 90%.
And secondly, Captan is an older fungicide than Matusalen, and it only has " PREVENTIVE " activity.
For the chemical fight against Monilia (Brown rot) new generation fungicides are used (relatively new, they have been used for more than 20 years), fungicides with “PREVENTIVE, CURATIVE AND ERADICATING” action.
This fungicide is suitable:

  • CYPROCONAZOLE

As far as insects, the cherry fruit fly, SWD, plum curculio, and Japanese beetle are common. Cherry growers spray insecticide to control these after petal fall. None of these problems are controlled by oil or copper.

Let’s see, the fruit flies (there are different species):

  • Ceratitis Capitata
  • Batrocera oleae
  • Drosophila suzukii
  • Etc…
    They affect equally both in hot and arid climates, as in cold and humid climates.
    The use of insecticides in the vegetative state has been the traditional method of fighting, but it is not very convenient and less so in amateur orchards where we are the ones who are going to consume the “poisoned” fruit.

Currently commercial plantations, and therefore amateurs with more reason, fight against this pest in a very different way.
There are three important fighting methods, and they are often used in combination

  • Massive trapping with attractant (can be used as a Diamonic phosphate attractant with excellent results)
  • Pheromones of sexual confusion (with this product, the males do not find the females to fertilize them, so the population does not multiply)
  • Magnet Med System (attraction and death), is the most innovative system with the best results on the market

And now we go with Japanese beetle ( Popillia Japonica ) .
Fighting with insecticides against the Japanese beetle is simply useless (fully proven).
To fight this pests, an entomopathogenic fungus is used called:

  • Beauveria bassiana

In Spain we have had really serious problems with a beetle that kills palm trees, it is commonly called “red weevil”, and its scientific name is Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.
This pest killed thousands and thousands of date palms in Spain, and since the Beauveria bassiana fungus has been used, the pest has been eradicated.
It is perfectly useful in the control of the Japanese beetle ( Popillia Japonica )

In Spain we do not have curculio plum (Conotrachelus nenuphar), and therefore I do not know how to fight against it.

Alan, I am not a Guru, I am only a amateur fruit growing, but with a little of experience in my luggage

Regards
Jose

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I have to take variance with the statement that insecticides aren’t effective against the Japanese Beetle. I have sprayed them with Sevin and they ‘drop like flys’. Perhaps with cherries the timing of ripeness and the beetle arrival doesnt allow for Sevin treatment?