Second Picture of Catawba Treasure native persimmon


#21

One of my main goals is to dig up a sucker but they are all quite large, like 7-12 feet. I’ve cleared some of the brush around the trunks in hopes that a new one would emerge but I may just start digging on one of these 7 footers and just prune it back really hard. Digging persimmons ain’t easy…but if I can just get a few to grow in pots then I can reproduce them like crazy.


#22

Just a good section of root will likely sprout shoots.
Not nessisary to have existing shoot ?
At least they do here , say if roots are cut with farm machinery, they will sprout shoots.
Just saying this may be a good opertunity to propagate self rooted trees, as most varietys ,the original ortet has been lost to time.
Also not saying this is efficient ? But , maybe?
Just a rare opportunity.


#23

I think it is a rare opportunity indeed. I can’t find much detailed info on propagating persimmons by root cuttings but I intend to try it. I’ve done it successfully before, albeit accidentally. I left potted persimmons in one place too long, then moved them, and they made clones in the soil and in the pots underneath.


#24

Put me on top of the list when you have one to sell / trade !


#25

There’s a lot of relevant info out there in the bonsai world. They use root cuttings all the time to propagate tropical “Princess” persimmons, and many other trees. Just take a piece of root, stick it in a pot, treat it like an established plant, and wait.
Full disclosure: I haven’t actually done this personally with persimmon, but I’ve seen it referenced in many credible sources.

@Hillbillyhort, that’s a good vocab word, ortet. I’ll have to remember that for my next Scrabble game.


#26

Wow, those are HUGE! I’d love to get some seeds even, if you end up giving/selling any?


#27

We sell the seeds on various Facebook groups every year, and we have some left if you’re interested. I think we’re selling 10 perfect ones for $6, shipping included, 50 seeds for $18, and 100 for $30. But I’d be willing to give discounts since they’re not “fresh from the fruit.” They’re all outside in a pot covered in mulch at the moment.


#28

I wonder if I could end up eating persimmons even earlier than you in a warm climate :slight_smile:


#29

Sure, I may be interested in 10 at a discount? :sunglasses:


#30

I hope so! I bet if we could plant these seeds all over the world we’d get some amazing new ones. It’d be interesting to see if this one ripens earlier in a warmer place, but I don’t think this is the earliest one; there are other large, good tasting ones here that start falling in late August/early September too, they’re just not as good all around as this one so I eat them but don’t collect seed or scion.


#31

30% off for all forum members (slight shipping upcharge if you live outside the continental US but otherwise shipping’s included).


#32

If I were to graft fuyu onto d lotus ,d Virginia 60 and d Virginia 90 chromosome what difference would be in the harvest time on all of the three??


#33

Hello,
This variety is slightly larger than what I grew up seeing in Tennessee. Would it be possible to obtain seeds of this one that I could try to grow in my area here in Western Wa?
Dennis
Kent, Wa


#34

I can certainly send you some seeds. We have only a couple hundred left from last fall’s bountiful harvest; we’ve been selling them at $6 for ten+ seeds shipped, $18 for 50+ seeds shipped, or $30 for 100+ seeds shipped, but I have offered anyone purchasing them through this forum a 30% discount.


#35

I could also offer a few Hachiya seed in exchange if you like mine have been stratified only about 30 days, need another 30 days in frig before planting. I donot sell mine but would be happy to buy yours just to get a few to plant locally. There are no native persimmons in this area. I miss having them.
Are yours stratified or ready to plant now?
Dennis


#36

Mine are ready to plant now, some are sprouting already. Have you germinated your hachiya seeds before? Do you store them moist? Some seeds like pawpaw, and I’d only guess Persimmon, can’t dry out or they loose viability forever.


#37

I have not germinated any hachiya seeds yet as they are still needing additional days to stratify. This will be my first season to try. I am storing them moist?


#38

Any luck with rooting any cuttings yet?


#39

Actually, if you are south of the Ohio River, it is likely a 60-chromosome type.

“There is a 90-chromosome American persimmon that is native to the northern U.S. and a 60-chromosome type that is native to Kentucky and the southern U.S. Most of the named varieties are of the 90-chromosome type. When named varieties of the 90-chromosome type are grown in Kentucky and are pollinated by the 60-chromosome type the seeds abort and many of the fruit are seedless or have few seeds. A few American persimmons, such as ‘Meader,’ are self-fruitful and will set seedless fruit”

Conventional wisdom says that the Ohio River is more or less the ‘dividing line’ between the 60 and 90-chromosome races. I’m well south of the Ohio… more or less right on the KY/TN line… so, all the natives in this area should be 60s…

The local American Persimmons down in Texas also tend to drop well before the first frost around November/December and are very gooey sweet (definitely not mealy) when they do. Which sounds like yours. So, I would assume that these Southern varieties (and yours) are actually 60-chromosome, then.


#40

Howdy, I haven’t tried rooting any cuttings of persimmons before because from what I understand it’s impossible. I have been able to graft it onto other native suckers though, and once the sap starts flowing hard this late winter I’ll attempt lots of grafts.
I honestly have no idea how many chromosomes it has, I’m just going off of other people’s descriptions of them. I can see pretty clearly though that here we have many large, good textured persimmons, and we also have many small, mealy ones, although both have good flavor usually.