Show off your loaves


#1

There’s nothing like fresh baked bread. My bread of choice is sourdough made with Einkorn wheat:


#2

Beautiful!


#3

I’m behind the trend, but wanted to try making sourdough starter with yeast from our fruit. My haskap have turned and I thought I could use those so started up one yesterday with 1/4 teff flour and a handful of fresh haskap.
Smells great and is foamy this morning! I can’t wait to try all sorts of things with it.


#4

I’ve been making a loaf a week for years- but only in the winter as it heats up my kitchen a LOT. This is basically the NYT Bittman loaf but with 2x the salt. Usually doesn’t last the day in my house.


#5

Curious as to why you double the salt - is it for flavor, strength or … ?


#6

Flavor. Original recipe calls for 1 teaspoon of salt, but the bread tastes better with 2 or even 3 teaspoons. If anyone is scared of making bread, or has tried and failed, you owe it to yourself to Google the NYT Bittman article for ‘no-knead bread.’ It’s only a slight exaggeration to say it changed my life. I never dreamed I could make bread this great with nearly zero effort and ingredients I already have in my kitchen.


#7

I’ve been making that no knead recipe for a few years. Actually do my sourdough pizza dough the same.


#8

oh wow - neat to see fellow bakers here! Some nice looking loaves up there :+1:
i’ve been baking hearth/artisan breads at home for several years.
I’ve slowed down a lot, but i generally follow the Tartine method and formulae when i do. I use a huge Lodge cast iron camp stove upside down as my dutch oven.
i’ll have to post some pics!


#9

I think this was a basic Tartine Country loaf. Turns out a lot of my pics have been cleaned off my PC by my wife LOL

I like to make croissants too (my wife’s favorite). Harder to do in the summertime.:confused:


#10

Great idea! I recently revived my starter by adding some fruit with yeast blooms.


#11

Some gorgeous bread, folks! Very impressive. I can almost smell those hot loaves!

I committed to the sourdough & ancient grain track a few years ago and never looked back. It was important for me to use natural airborne yeast/bacteria from my locale, and to use pre-hybridized wheat. It’s been a labor of love, as it takes planning and timing to pull off two loaves per week.


#12

I just found the no-knead bread method a few weeks ago and started to have some fun. I also modified the process a bit by doing a few times of stretch and fold in between bulk fermentation and final proofing.

Here’s one baked about two weeks ago, cranberry pecan bread with 50% whole wheat flour.


#13

timely thread…I made a couple of rustic Italian loaves for a potluck dinner we went to this passed weekend. I think it was a food network recipe…It had taken ages before we could finally find bread flour, everyone became a baker when COVID hit…

Anyway, the wife wanted me to buy bread but I said screw it, I’m making it…it had been a while…Never tried the no knead, I’m a stand mixer guy personally…Came out with a nice crispy crust and chewy texture just how I like it…sorry no pics, it didn’t last long…


#14

You guys are torturing me.


#15

The no-knead recipe is best using regular flour. I’ve tried many and cheap, easy to find Gold Medal is perfect. If you like bread you should try it. No need for a mixer or any kneading at all. A couple quick stirs to mix the ingredients and other than proofing it you are done.


#16

Me too… :yum:


#17

A noble goal for sure. I’ve used einkorn a few times. it’s not as strong as modern wheats, it seems, so it’s a little harder to work with. The flavor is excellent - makes me think of honey.


#18

Im going to give it a try but do not have a dutch oven , any recommendations? I will order one from amazon


#19

Yes, Einkorn is much lower carb/gluten and is therefore a little different to work with than modern grains. I don’t get the big bulbous oven rise that modern flour provides. That in combination with the sourdough makes for a nicely digestible loaf. I read that even people with gluten intolerance could eat sourdough Einkorn bread. Sure enough, I found a co-worker who was gluten intolerant and she enjoyed this bread without any stomach trouble. Certainly not scientific or conclusive, but worth noting.


#20

Of all the things I’ve tried, the best seems to be my ceramic crock pot with a glass lid. A very close second is my cast iron dutch oven:


Both are really heavy and I preheat them to 500*.