Show off your loaves


#123

Sounds like a truly, delightful day! You are a great teacher!
Everything you made and posted looks scrumptious! I’ll have a slice of each please! :wink:
Thanks for sharing your knowledge and skills.


#124

Sourdough?

I made a starter the other day and it took off so fast in this heat.


#125

No. I’ve made a few sourdough loaves (with a 12 year old starter) but this was a country walnut loaf. Basically a recipe from the bread maker. Toasted Walnuts, honey, olive oil. Really nice subtle hint of sweetness.


#126

Could you post the recipe for the sweet pizza dough?


#127

Sure @Anne ! When I wrote the recipe out for my friend I tried to remember that this was for a very beginning baker with no prior yeast bread experience, so this may be more detailed than you need. Also, this is a very simple, fast dough I came up with that works for me. You can certainly get a lot fancier and more complicated. Dessert pizza in our house never lasts more than 1 day, or 2 at the very most, so I don’t worry about making an enriched dough that needs to stay soft and moist for a longer time period.

If your fruit filling of choice has a lot of juice and is not very thick, you may want to brush the crusts with an egg wash and par-bake them for 5-8 minutes to set the dough a bit, then take them out and proceed with spreading the fruit filling and topping.

I have made filling with sour pie cherries, peaches, apples, blackberries, and strawberry/rhubarb. It’s all good!

Sweet Pizza Dough for Dessert Pizzas

3 cups flour
1 tsp yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 tsp sugar
1 Tbs oil

Mix all ingredients in a large bowl with a wooden spoon until well blended.

1 cup warm water or more as needed

Add enough warm water to form a dough that holds together, and beat well.
If the dough sticks to the sides, it is too wet. Sprinkle in a little more flour,
1 Tbs at a time, until the dough clears the sides of the bowl.

Knead by hand for 3-5 minutes, adding flour only if dough sticks
to hands or counter.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and rest for 1 hour.

After resting the dough for an hour, take it out and place it on a lightly floured counter. To make individual dessert pizzas, divide the dough into 3 or 4 equal pieces. Gently shape or roll each piece into a 6"- 7” circle, leaving the edges taller to form the crust edge.

Place crusts on parchment paper on the pan you will be baking it on.

Cover pizza crust with plastic wrap that has been sprayed with oil and let rest 15 min to an hour, depending on how thick you like your crust to be.

Place pizza stone in oven and preheat to 375 degrees.

After the dough has risen to your preference, brush the crust edges with butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.

Spread fruit filling of your choosing over each crust.
Use pie filling, or fresh fruit that has been gently cooked and thickened on the stove (use thickener of choice - corn starch or ClearJel, etc.). It usually takes about 1 to 1.5 cups of fruit filling for each pizza.

Sprinkle streusel* over the filling. See this recipe: https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/streusel-topping-recipe
I usually add about 1 tsp or more of cinnamon to the streusel topping.

Leave crusts on the pan and bake at 375 for ~ 15 minutes or until crust is done and streusel is golden brown. If the bottom is not done enough, slide the pizza onto the stone and bake another 5 minutes until crust is done to your preference. Remove from oven, place pizzas on a rack to cool slightly before slicing. You can also drizzle the pizza with a vanilla/powdered sugar glaze after it has cooled, if you like.


#128

Thank you so much. Your recipe is detailed and clear enough that even a non-baker like me will be successful!


#129

You are welcome! Post some pictures if you give it a try! :smiley:


#130

The brioche recipie from above is on there too!


#131

This is strawberry tree (arbutus unedo) fruit bread developed by Leiria University. They use fresh fruit and flour… It’s great and a bit sweet… :yum:


#132

Spelt and sweet potato flour bread… Yummy! :yum:


#133


This is my weekly sandwich bread. I use molasses instead of sugar to give it a deeper flavor. One neat thing about this loaf is that it uses wheat my family grew. We did only a 30 second grind, which gives it alot more texture. This flour wasn’t good in pancakes, but I like that coarseness in the bread.


#134

Awesome! Like you, I use a sorghum syrup and also blackstrap molasses frequently as sweetener. I basically never use granulated sugar.


#135

Yup, I use honey. I bought molasses which I need to try one of these days.


#136

I baked a white sandwich loaf and a few buns today.
There might be a bun missing… :yum:

A friend asked me to bake some breakfast type sweet breads for a brunch later this week. I needed to practice since it has been awhile since I have made this braided loaf recipe. Both are filled with a sweetened cream cheese layer and thickened Montmorency cherries on top of that.
For the brunch I will be making one blueberry and one raspberry. I will position some of the blueberries and raspberries to show through the braids, that has more eye-appeal.
The dough is a little difficult to work with but they turned out very good. Light, flaky, very moist. I was pleased. The crust looks a little brown but is not tough and doesnt taste over done. Hopefully the ones I bake for the brunch turn out as well.


#137

Breakfast treats like this and of course the aforementioned croissants are favorites here!
Looks great. I need to learn how to make an authentic danish…


#138

@TrilobaTracker, This is a pretty easy recipe. Based on this one:

Check out KAF’s Danish Pastry recipe.

Haven’t made those for awhile but they were absolutely delicious! Just a little more time consuming.


#139

Thank you so much!
Will check em out!
:croissant:


#140

Made these the other weekend. Basic french bread with KAF unbleached white flour, salt, water, yeast. 1kg flour, 74% hydration, 2.5% salt, 1tsp yeast. I make a poolish with 400g water/400g flour and a dash of yeast and let that sit over night. Then I make the rest of the dough in the morning and do stretch and folds for a few hours as it rises and develops. Then I put it in the fridge overnight. Next day I take it out and let it sit on the counter for an hour or so to warm up, shape the loaves, proof for about an hour, then bake at max oven temp (550F) for about 20 mins, steam via squirt bottle every minute for first 6 minutes.

I’ve had more open crumbs than this on some occasions, but this one turned out pretty well. Delicious the first day, nice as toast on days 2-3, stale by day 4 (though we almost always finish it before then).

For a couple years I was doing sourdough according to Tartine method, but then I stopped baking so much and the sourdough does not work as well if you are not doing it every week or two. Plus I could never get it as airy as a bread with white flour and instant yeast, and it takes more planning and time to execute. Still, it was nice bread, had a more complex flavor, and kept for longer. Maybe I’ll get back to it one day.

I did a write up for this style of bread a few years ago - I don’t do everything the same now but it is pretty close.


#141

Great-looking crumb! Nicely done.
My wife also loves baguettes but I don’t make them often. When I do, it’s almost always the poolish recipe from Bread Baker’s Apprentice.
I have only done the tartine recipe once, a long time ago, and I don’t recall the outcome.
I’ve been meaning to try it again - your post may be the inspiration I need!


#142

Most recent croissants!