Wanting to buy Indar


#41

Its 1.5 lbs in 100 gallons according to the label which is a little shy of 2 cups per 100 gallons so 1 tsp/gallon should be reasonably close… Will add to the guide.

EDIT: this is referring to Elevate, not Indar. 1tsp/gallon for Elevate and 1/4 tsp/gallon for Indar.


#42

I saw yesterday it was 1/4 tsp/gal


#43

Yes looks like a really good product. It could be used on strawberries for gray mold, a problem i have. If you have the label handy is strength for berries different?
A mention of no resistance but the company is asking if any seen to contact them. It also suggests to not use this product steady, but to alternate with others. I saw some labels, or info from the company but couldn’t find dosage info. I don’t plan to use it at present, but will need this info if a need arises. Thanks for bringing this up, important info.


#44

Here is the label:

The fact that they recommend to rotate fits perfectly with my need for something to alternate with Indar. There were a few other things but they cost a lot more. Elevate was about $90, still expensive but it will last many years for me.


#45

I was referring to Elevate there, sorry. I edited to be clear.

Note that its hard to be accurate on these amounts for the home grower as they are often per acre rates. The amount of water per acre commercial growers use varies a lot, from 50-300 gallons. I used 100 gallons per acre for the Elevate rate.


#46

Thanks, I want to get it as right as possible, given the very small amounts involved


#47

The rate for peaches is 6 oz. per acre for Indar 2F. On a per ounce basis, that would translate to 7260 sq.ft./ounce of Indar.

I’ve held a gallon jug of Indar for 3 years before and it didn’t show any excessive settling and no separation.


#48

Olpea, thanks for the reply!! Makes me feel better about picking up a couple oz’s. Should last my little BYO for quite some time.

Thanks again!!


#49

Me too! Seems like a gallon lasts forever.

I’m going to use some Indar on Apples for the first time this year. The Apple pathologist suggested that I include Indar at TC/Pink rather than Rally so that may help me empty the jug a little faster. The other suggestions were Manzate/Rally at first bloom and Captan/Rally at late bloom so my Rally will not go to waste.


#50

Indar is about the cheapest effective fungicide around. It runs about $13/acre. I have a couple bags of Elevate for the backyard, but have hardly used any. I think last time I checked it was something north of $60/acre, so I’ve treated that stuff like gold.

I only have 5 acres of fruit, but with multiple sprays it adds up. I sell my produce pretty cheap, so I have to watch every cost I can.


#51

I figure my 1/2 pint is a lifetime supply


#52

It will cover a lot of area. 1.3 acres of trees at the labeled rate. But for peaches, it’s labeled for 8 sprays per season. That means using it at the max interval (which most backyard growers wouldn’t need to) would mean 8 ounces would treat about 7000 sq.ft. of trees of peaches for one season (Apples are only allowed 4 sprays per season, so area would be considerably different).


#53

Mark, How many trees are you spraying totally?


#54

Off the top of my head, I have a little less than 500 trees (counting the farm and house). I’ve been replacing a lot of trees the last few years (about 40/year) so a lot of the trees are new and don’t require much spray.

I sell a few other odds and ends, about 500’ of tomatoes 6-700’ of blackberries right now. Pretty small by commercial standards, but it keeps me busy enough.


#55

How man varieties of peaches do you grow?


#56

Spud.

I have about 70 peach/nect varieties. That sounds like a lot, but it’s still too much for me. I’d like to get rid of another 20 varieties, probably. Some varieties I just have one or two trees, like Honey Royale, or Galaxy. Those I’ll probably get rid of this summer, along with some others.

I went through a shotgun phase of trying everything, to realizing my climate/model works only with stuff which produces good, and tastes good. Still working on it, and haven’t figured it all out yet, by any means. But I am much more cautious of new varieties, as a commercial grower, who has to make some money off the trees planted.

Lately the only new peach I want to try is Tianna, for a particular window I need a good peach. Once again ACN is the only one who offers it. I am so sick of that nursery. Every year I order 25 trees or so, and every year they charge high prices and MAX shipping, because they always ship my small order in a box the size of a house. This year they charged me $100 in shipping for something like a $400 order. Tianna is the only new tree I want to try, but if they offer a few trees of that variety for retail at $30, I’m going for that.


#57

Honey Royale is a good-tasting peach!


#58

And a great tasting nectarine…!!


#59

I’ve kept this one tree of Honey Royale just because it’s one of Fruitnut’s favs. Like most of the CA varieties, it’s been a problem child for me so far. Most of the time CA sub acid varieties don’t work out for me (climate is so different than CA, or TX). This will be this tree’s fifth year and I still haven’t seen a single nect, which is very unusual for my orchard. This year it has lots of blooms, so we’ll see how it goes.

Not expecting much here. Subacid’s many times don’t build the sugar here to make a mark on the memory, apparently like they do in very dry climates.


#60

ooops - right!