Wildlife in our gardens


#682

i believe our fear of snakes is ingrained in our genetics. humans evolved in africa , where there were snakes large enough to at least eat our children! its normal to have a reaction like that. until we get ourselves together and realize they aren’t the boggyman our dna precevies them to be. dont blame you for killing the big one. not everyone is comfortable handling a large wild snake! :wink:


#683

Is the big snake stuck in the wire?


#684

I think so too Moose


#685

This one much less scarry


#686

My wife was cleaning out some weeds around the potato and pepper patch, which is below the barn. She thought she’d also clear out some weeds that were growing against the barn.

I was in the house and heard her yell, and went down to see what the ruckus was about. I heard the dog barking furiously, and found out why:

It was what looks like a black king snake, not poisonous. It looked about to be 3ft long, and had yellowish dots near its belly. She wanted to whack it with her hoe, but I said let it be, as it feeds on rodents, and I believe even poisonous snakes. I was down by the barn a few days ago, and saw a snake going into some other weeds, it looked like this one, so it may be the same one, hanging out in the barn doing some hunting.

So, we let it go, and it slinked away into another weedy patch. We are very careful when we are outside, taking care where we reach, and walk. I have never seen a poisonous snake around our farm, but my bro in law killed one at their place about half a mile from here last year.


#687

A Northern Bob White I saw go greet the robins moments ago and then having fun chasing them as well as running fast to an undetermined place and then running back! I rarely see these but hear them non-stop which I love their call.

Dax


#688

Nice pictures. I haven’t seen one in ages but I do hear them.


#689

It’s amazing how much we take for granted. I used to see them all the time and I always enjoyed them but never realized how much until they were gone.

P.S. great pic


#690

No picture this time, but a couple nights ago I was watering trees in my small orchard right by the open walk in gate, and a brazen young bull moose walked up eyeing my tasty trees. He was only a few feet away when I hopped over and latched the gate in his face. These critters have a lot of nerve.


#691

I hear them wish one would visit.


#692

They were all but gone here. I started eliminating their natural predators that eat their eggs. Quail, Doves etc. Lay their eggs on the ground. Possums, raccoon, armadillo, coyote will all eat every egg they can find. I started about 5 years ago now and the last two years I have entire covey’s of quail and dove in abundance. Very nice healthy turkey population too.


#693

Awesome pictures, Dutch.

Dax


#694

Beautiful and beautiful land too!


#695

Here in Missouri it’s mostly habitat loss, fescue has replaced warm season grasses and farmers keep fence rows and pasture borders clean eliminating edge habitat.


#696

I’m guessing there won’t be many pollinators here. At least it looks like they have done their work already!

Katy


#697

Gorgeous!


#698

My squirrels have gotten very sneaky now that I have a dog, but they are still out there. They are once again attacking my apples like crazy. I can count almost 8 per day per tree missing! My Pristines are quite small this year, no rain, but they are turning yellow, ripening and disappearing!


#699

Forest rats.


#700

They’re into my Kieffer pears, which I would rather if it kept them out of other stuff


#701

it looks like it, but actually he was just sall enough to get through…he was just weaved in and out of the wire like in the photo when I found him. However, if he had actually eaten a chicken and had it inside him, there is no way he could have gotten back out with that lump in his belly. I’ve heard of this happening.