2019 Grafting Thread


#41

Very good feeling!


#42

I’ve never even been able to make a W & T cut that was good enough to hold the stock and scion together!


#43

Practice, practice…….
I finally did enough that I don’t even need to hold the two sticks up and compare the cuts…they are the same length

Will have to be patient to see what percent of mine are successful this year…but certainly some are as leaves have come out on the scionwood. Especially the grafts to seedling stock I had in containers that weren’t grafts to bare root trees.


#44

Mulberries

Kokuso and Pakistan now pushing


#45

Apples Wickson and Bite Me(skillcult seedling)
Both have taken.


#46

I guess I shall join the fun. Here are most of my grafts for the year that I did a few weeks back. Both cleft and whip & tongue. A good number of them are budding so it seems like some are successful. So fun!


#47

Did my first bark grafts. 5 types of apricot into the July Elberta peach I didn’t like.


Also my first peach grafts. Victoria on to my unknown variety. Hopefully gives me later peaches.


#48

I finished all of my bench grafts about a week ago and the are starting to show some growth, I was wondering if it is ok to stick them outside now? They are in 1 gal pots. There will be some lows in the low 40’s within the next 10 days and highs will be in the mid to high 60’s.


#49

I graft mostly pears and apples and never found those temperatures to hurt my grafts outside.


#50

This is my first attempt at grafting. I grafted a ( unknown) self fertile plum to a wild plum.


#51

What kind of graft?bb


#52

Cleft.


#53

I know from seed it would take a long time in “years to fruit.”

Curious. If I were to buy a barerooted 2’-3’ or even a 4’-5’ sapling. How does that compare in time to grafting on a fully mature tree? On say, an apple or pear tree? Shorter? Longer? About the same?


#54

Hews Virginia crab looks like a take


#55

Where’s your famous red cheese wrapper?


#56

It must have not stuck good and came off , here it is right after I grafted, with the baby bell waxIMG_3166


#57

Ah…there it is :smiley:


#58

I’m doing best with peaches so far. Unfortunately, that’s not good news :frowning: I bought a lot of wood this year from California, and most of it was a waste of money because it wasn’t dormant enough. The peaches weren’t wood I bought.

I’m so bummed! But I tried simple things like one plum variety on various trees and couldn’t get one good take? The buds push through the parafilm and later dry up. I just can’t believe I placed such a large order, smh.

Maybe it’s not as bad as it looks. Most still have a bud that is still under parafilm. I like to use 3 buds on a scion so there are backups. Crossing my fingers!


#59

Hi I’m new to this forum I just planted some fruit trees not too long ago and I would like to graft different varieties. When is the best time to get cuttings? And when is the best time to do grafting in to some of the fruit trees. So far I planted apples, pears, peaches, plums, cherries, pomegranates and a persimmon tree. Thanks in advance


#60

You can do grafting in three seasons: spring, summer, and fall. You collect scions from the dormant trees. My experience is as late as they start breaking dormancy. The fresher the scions are, the easier they will take. You can do branch grafting and budding.
In summer, you can also do greenwood branch grafting if you can protect from the sun and keep the scions in moisture. Mostly I do budding in summer. I collect the hardened greenwood as the scions. I saw some people tried with new shoots.
In the fall, budding only by using hardened greenwood scions.