Mature viewers only -- explicit Jujube videos/photos


#101

Yesterday I noticed something while I was removing grass and weed before watering. I had 3 seedlings of unknown origin, I lost record, and one was dead in spring. But while I was cleaning I noticed that it started to grow from root again.


Oooh how happy I was then. And even more important thing is that I noticed difference in leaf shape compared to spinosa.
These are the other 2



And spinosa

There is difference so those jujubes probably are seedlings of la fleur raf sent to me last year. Im pretty sure of that, although I dont have any proof. Raf thanks again, although you dont remember :grin: You are generous and probably many people contact you so its ok :slightly_smiling_face:
In 4th photo it can be seen how much seedling has grown,even in full shade cause it is beneath apple (im holding it where has stoped growth last year). So fertilization and watering was big success, for me at least. Jujubes are drought tolerant but that not means that water will be bad for them.


#102

Hi Martin, i hope you didn’t take offense i forgot. Probably should announce publicly that apart from getting old, i am a bit autistic and admittedly socially awkward. Have never opened accounts with facebook, twitter etc simply due to my social-forgetfulness. Growingfruit is pretty much my facebook account and even here am ‘slow’ and often clueless… My most awkward, cringeworthy and absolute klutz moments are folks have worked with, and especially those of the opposite gender that even though would like to attend reunions, i would rather not so as not to ruin the atmosphere.

anyway, so glad some la fleur seeds grew. Did i send you contorted seeds as well? Was wondering cause the third picture you posted seems to have the trait. Btw, and i hope i don’t sound sophomoric(yet again…), when spinosa is mentioned, it actually is a true jujuba, but of the wild-type often used for rootstock by nurseries. The full-blooded spinosa of antiquity (aka acidojujuba) is actually unknown and impossible to identify-- at least here in usa, as many of the rootstock used here are spinosa-types, or wild-types that have been diluted due to cross pollination. They are only pertained to as ‘spinosa’ due to their strong wild-type characteristics–extremely spiny, small-fruited, and sour, but they are true jujuba’s

of the photos you posted above, it is the last one that is not of the jujuba species. It is a true Ziziphus, but hard for me to say if it is the tropical species, or a middle-eastern/african species. Quite sure though it is neither jujuba or spinosa.

Ziziphus jujuba generally pertains to domesticated chinese jujubes, while spinosa is actually of the same species— Ziziphus jujuba, but with subspecies as spinosa or acidojujuba added to the genus and species, often written as Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa
taxonomy and nomenclature is painstaking sometimes!


#103

btw, someone posted a protest-comment at our youtube channel, saying we were badmouthing cornus mas.

or sour-graping if that’s more apt. We do apologize as it is true that never got to try a cornelian cherry that is not sour, so admittedly biased and clueless about cornus cultivars that are more sweet than sour. Anyway, will remove the offending verbiage as soon as able.


#104

self-rooted sihong lateral. Undoubtedly one of the most valuable, intriguing and mysterious case-studies we managed to get our hands on in a long, long time(thanks to a good member here :slight_smile: )

intriguing because it evidently produced sizeable fruits on adventitious roots even at a ‘young age’ and sparse development. And mysterious because laterals ultimately assume deciduous fates, regressing after several years, unless a vegetative(perennial) upright stem buds out from one of its fruiting spurs, which does not happen often with jujus. The fruit-bearing green stems here are strictly deciduous annuals which will be shed in late autumn this yr. So really curious if it will produce an upright from the roots, or if it opts to develop one from the lateral.
reminds me of that toy story movie character-- the baby head directly attached to spider legs. Quite functional in the absence of a torso.


#105

Nice fruit. I still have a few blooms but no fruit. I think it should have been placed amongst the vigorous bloomers…


#106

keep me posted, as am really curious, has yours suckered or grown upright stems?


#107

Not yet…


#108

it is a race then :wink:


#109

You’re on… :laughing:


#110

Not at all. I just wanted to say thanks :slightly_smiling_face:
Even I was not sure if it was you, so I checked earlier messages :face_with_hand_over_mouth:
And I thought a lot about seeds from back then and im thinking that was more than one variety,but I still cant remember name of the other. I’m pretty sure that even few seeds from china had sprouted. But the only information about varieties was photo with containers and names, which is gone when my cellphone was stolen. I will let these seedlings to grow and when they produce fruit we will see what is it. I will have spinosa for rootstocks. They are growing nicely :sunglasses:


#111

you’re welcome, and thank you! Do keep everyone here posted re: your orchard endeavors.

the trans-atlantic correspondence sure adds variety and perspective to this good forum :slight_smile:


#112

drought conditions in a pot: one of the rare instances in nature when a provider of nutritious fruits is actually more resilient than non-edible, noxious weeds. One of which is a xerophytic mojave desert native, the spotted spurge(seen here as the creeping weed with droopy leaves), whereas the sihong juju seedling continues to hold its foliage high.


#113

That has happened here too…I was looking at my seedlings and thought they looked good and then discovered some almost crunchy crab grass in one of the pots. Okay. Time to water!


#114

Common Raf, help out the Sihong jujube seedling by weeding a bit. The weeds are choking the juju. It said I wanted a new owner maybe Tony!

Tony


#115

if plants/trees have rights, i’d already have been imprisoned as a teenager, and will probably be still incarcerated as i type this :laughing:

that’s seeing it half-empty. I see it half-full as actually think the juju is choking the weeds lol!

you will definitely get budwood(better yet-- a root cutting) if it bears good and relatively large fruits. I already did the dehydration test so that is a check mark on one of its stats. :slight_smile:


#116

tale of two seedlings: both 1 yr.old from random seed.

Sharing one pot, the one on the left is vegetatively precocious while the one at right evidently in a hurry to bear fruits at the expense of growth. Also notable the subtle differences between hue of foliage. One with apple-green leaves while the other a darker green.


#117

You’re a lucky man :slightly_smiling_face:


#118

Just got through repotting 103 Honey Jar seedlings NONE of them looking anywhere as good as either of those two!!! :cry:. I had decided to make up my own potting mix and it was a dismal failure… paired with my last year’s fiasco of feeding my rootstock seedlings twice with time release fertilizer and watching most of them die a time release death. I am very disappointed with these HJ seedlings growth over the spring months. So I’ve changed my potting mix and have started feeding them cautiously. They did have some new root growth even though I’ve seen no foliar growth since early spring. Perhaps I’ll see some improvement!


#119

probably more stubborn than lucky.
It is probably a one in fifty or one in a hundred chance of getting a good quality cultivar when growing from seed, even when growing from seeds of desirable cultivars.

hj seedlings are slow-growers here as well, there must be an ovule-determined trait for runty growth…


#120

Yes, if I think about it it’s always harder getting HJ seedling going. The seeds though are so easily hatched with nice looking little seedlings. It’s the second year that they just want to be begged to grow…