Pakistan Mulberry in Zone 7 possible? (+ trying & growing PawPaws, Persimmons etc.)


#101

I was always told that they are good for the gardens soil (eating all those insects) and that they dont damage roots.

Voles woud be a problem, but i havent seen them here


#102

i find it really intriguing for something which bears berries-- to be growing that tall… and 60 feet is quite intense!

as for wellington, i have tried some and they were pretty good and heavy-bearing. It is often the poster-child many nurseries use to depict true morus nigras, which kind of takes away credit from its true merits, but it is a good variety if you’re ok with a fast-growing tree. Not sure if it will grow as tall as your rubra, but was very vigorous here in the desert.


#103

their mole hills make me snicker, actually,( such hard-working creatures that we never get to see!) and that they would show up in great numbers, only when you just planted something also makes me scratch my head, in a conceding joke-is-on-me stance. Much like the kids in our neighborhood–they start playing kick-and-catch soccer, only when i have grafted our front yard trees…

btw, do you grow your trees’ rootballs in wire baskets? probably the only way of giving you some peace of mind. Being carnivores, moles may not gnaw the roots, but their digging underground could be injurious to trees especially in their already compromised conditions as bare-root. I think the friable and high organic matter used by nurseries for growing their bare-root trees tend to attract plenty worms and bugs.


#104

Yeah :frowning:

None of the trees i planted where bare rooted.

The only bare rooted i have are those plants from demoerbeiboom that i have potted.


#105

and at least one of them is a jujubenboom? Curious if you bought the redlands and honey jar/sugarcane


#106

Not yet.

They are only available around may at subtropy :slight_smile:

I hope i can get some.


#107

oh, i see.

keep us posted!


#108

i had bad experience with grafting, was not succesfull, maybe did it not in right time or used bad grafting technique. if you get fresh seeds, they germinate very easy with high percentage. yes, good source of rootstocks or wild growing volunteers :slight_smile:

how red mulberries taste? very rare here…


#109

i have tried at least a dozen mulb varieties, but have yet to try a true rubra. Perhaps others here may clue you in. The closest thing to a rubra i have tried was an illinois ever-bearing which was pretty good, and productive, but a very large tree(for our purposes).


#110

Yes,I do have Wellington.To me the taste is close to Silk Hope and probably Illinois Everbearing,from what little I’ve tried of that one.
I’ll be offering scions again this year. Brady


#111

Cuttings from spring and no progress yet, not sprouting? Is the bark still green when you scrape small slice away?


#112

I just checked on them and there is no life there. Brady


#113

I think they just like the worms that tend to get there after you water the trees. Especially if it hasn’t rained for a while.
Moles are fine but voles are a huge problem here


#114

Yeah I have nothing to graft to, but will keep that in mind once I do, down the road. Thanks for the info! I’ll look for seedlings this next season.

Well I would not want that anyway! The trees I was speaking of are wild trees. I have found 4 of them on Russell Island. All have fruit very high except one. Luckily the one is the best tasting of them all. I’m going to look for seedlings next year for grafting root stock.


#115

I had that problem in a small yard once and after applying Diazinon granules,they were gone.The stuff probably kills most of their worm food and they either starve or move to another location.It’s a trade off,but the worms are probably back now. Brady


#116

I checked my pakastan today after several days of cold temps. The coldest day we had a high of 18F and a low of 0F. It appears ok with bright green on the smallest branches when I scraped the bark with my thumb.


#117

I have Cooke’s Pakistan Mulberry (which i heard may be slightly more hardier and longer fruit than regular Pakistan) in Zone 7a (Phila, PA… where we have hot n’ humid 80F-100F average summers … and with 25F-45F average winters [of course goes into the extremes occasionally every year; like the teens, single digits, or recently the occasional 50F-60F day with our strange new global warming :slight_smile: ]).

I am thinking of removing the base of the tree and shipping it to my uncle in CA.
I’ve gotten a couple fruits every year, but every year the winter damage is tremendous.

This is a summary of generally how it grew for me:
1st year: lost 50 buds on my new plant (it was a Bush Form tree with 4 nice espalier-like trunks low on the tree from Bay Laurel Nursery i think), minus luckily 1 bud. lets say grew to 4-5ft that summer from that 1 bud.
2nd year: now at 5ft but died back down to 1 bud, 2ft off the ground. lets say it grew 7ft that summer (5ft+initial 2ft)
3rd year: now at 7ft, but died back down to 3ft. lets say it grew 9ft (6ft + initial 3ft) that summer.
4th year: now at 9ft, but then died back down to 4ft. lets say it grew 10-12ft (6+ft + initial 4ft) that summer (grew pretty tall).
5th year: now at 10-12ft, then died back down to 4ft
6th year: generally same as above (5th year: now at 10-12ft, then died back down to 4ft)

It grows then dies back alot and then repeats.
A shame really, the leaves are out of this world. huge 12"+ heart-shaped leaves.
The 1st few feet of my tree is pretty ugly from all the dieback and a new main trunk forming off the side of the true ‘main trunk’.

I’d stick to Illinois Everbearing or some other stuff RainTree Nursery offers if in the states.


#118

Probably sound advice. i plan to buy the ones that should work here, but may experiment with Pakistan, after I have the more suitable ones for my area.


#119

Hi, i’m another mulberry enthusiast from Europe (more precisely France).

I think it is wise to plant pakistan in place that takes time to warm in spring to avoid fast awakening. I planted mine north of a 2m buidling for that purpose. My tree just taken several nights at -10.5°C with no apparent damage, i’ll check in spring. Hope to get the first fruit crop next year.

I have some scion to exchance if any is interested


#120

Regarding the plants that i have…

Should i prune them after planting?

We never did this on the other trees/bushes that we have.

But these are weepy and long and the roots have a diameter of only 10-15cm

What would you do?

http://growingfruit.org/uploads/default/optimized/3X/0/1/0103d8b649bee8459b2501ea9320b63d2104f197_1_690x511.jpg