Questions not deserving of a whole thread


#681

Yes, and no,. I just looked at Raintree 15 bucks, Stark is 13,00
Bay Laurel though is 7.00. Seems like the west coast nurseries are cheaper.
I bought mine from Willis, and many have complained about this nursery, it’s trees actually. They were the only nursery selling the grape I wanted. The plant came and it’s excellent size and health, so is the raspberry plant I threw in the order. I paid 8 bucks for the grape vine.


#682

Thanks Drew51, I hadn’t checked Willis or Bay Laurel. Good prices on the grapes! Neither carry Somerset though. It’s probably just as well since Shipping costs are $19 minimum, or 25% of total at Willis, so more than I wanted to pay anyway. :wink:


#683

I bought my Somerset seedless 2 years ago from Schlabach’s nursery (Amish, 585-798-6198) for $8 each. You will need to send a check. The have quality stock.


#684

Thank you, ZombieFruit! I have been meaning to call them and request a catalog. I have read many good reviews of them from people here, just haven’t gotten around to calling or writing to them yet. Thanks!!


#685

Yes, I ordered another item and postage was the same! I agree with you postage is crazy on most sites. I too wanted a specific grape and Willis is the only place with it. i have two grape vines now, so don’t need anymore. I have been growing Einset for a bit, not a bad grape, but looking for something a little better.
Double A vineyards has Somerset for 9 bucks but are out of stock. the grape sounds a lot like Einset.

Jung has somerset for 12 bucks
Indiana berry has them for 9 bucks, but you have to call for availability. Indiana Berry is one of the best nurseries around.
About 6 or 7 other nurseries carry it too. Seems very common and looks good too!


#686

Which is weird because my cherries bloom well ahead of my nectarine. By a couple weeks it seems.

Scott


#687

Working outside today when a boom sprayer sets up 50 Ft Up wind (25 mph today). I make a bunch of calls to the city who owns the land and barge into the office of some guy and yell at him. They of course no nothing and don’t care. I catch the applicator at a corner. He says it dry pot ash. Great! but, I still don’t want to breath your chemicals. I tell him not to drift me out again. He says okay. Reasonable response form me? maybe not, but hopefully they are extra careful when they spray the 24D in a few weeks. City guy doesn’t want crazy guy in his office again.


#688

Mine overlap they are so close. I’m going to start writing bloom times down. My memory is not what it used to be. When you were here my hard neck garlic was not coming up, I thought all of them were gone. It’s coming up now, first time both hard and soft were so far apart in growth. The last three years they grew at the same time. Reminds me of one of Farmer Fred’s rules of gardening: Number - 7 Everything you know is wrong.
I like Number 5 - Mother Nature bats last.


#689

I thought it was weird that you would have lost the hard neck and had the soft neck survive. As far as I knew hard necks are hardier…

I’m going to have to look up those rules of gardening…

Scott


#690

Ha! Fred Hoffman does a gardening show in CA. It’s not that relevant to me, but I enjoy the guests, and I also like to listen to the CA farm report he hosts.
http://farmerfred.com/gardenrules2014.htm


#691

Not sure if Kansas is in the Driftwatch (On line site) program but I would look into. No guarantee some moron wont do the same thing again, but I think it would be another ACE in your hand in a lawsuit. At least thats how I look at it. Remember you are growing a high dollar specialty crop so you are considered a inferior farmer by the same folks that grow low value crops and barely turn a legitimate profit and those that provide services to them. Yes tongue in cheek somewhat.


#692

@KSprairie, I was just looking through this thread and saw you’re interested in Somerset grape. I just checked Indiana Berry and they have it stock for $8 but in limited numbers, so you have to call them. They have many other grapes for sale, including a couple of seedless reds also, same price, and shipping is $10, if your order is under $25 total. So, you could get 3 plants and shipping would still be $10.

https://indianaberry.com/products/1/8/Plants/Grapes

I just got my black and raspberry order from them and they look like very nice plants with big roots. I’m planting them next week.


#693

Thanks subdood, and Drew51! I should have checked some more on-line sites before I posted my original question. I hadn’t heard of Somerset up until a few days ago, so I wondered if that variety was common enough that it would be available at local stores, like Concord is. I made a few calls but no one has it around me, at least not yet. It will be faster to just order than to go checking in local stores. It looks like $8 to $10 per plant is about the norm, plus shipping. Thanks for the help.

I ordered 40+ raspberries from Indiana Berry last year and have been really happy with them. Great quality, price, and service.
I first read about Somerset on a couple of threads here. It sounds like a vigorous, good choice for zone 5. I have a couple Concord seedles and Reliance vines, but wanted to try one more. My Reliance hasn’t fruited yet and isn’t very vigorous at this point. I really like Concord for juice and fresh eating. Thanks again for the info. I can’t believe I forgot to check Indiana Berry!


#694

You’re welcome. Just curious what kind of rasps did you get?

Being in Kansas, you wouldn’t think it’d get that cold (zone 5?), but up in the north part I suppose so. I grew up in NE OK, and it got pretty cold in the winter, but not too bad. Great place for growing peaches and pecans!


#695

Last spring I put in Anne, Encore, Jewel, and Prelude. I already had Heritage and Caroline for several years before that, but ended up removing them due to disease issues and starting over in new raised beds with these 4 varieties. The Anne fruited in the fall, and the earlier ripening berries were great! Then the stink bugs arrived and ruined the majority of later ripening berries. I don’t have a strategy for defeating them yet. Looking forward to tasting the other 3 this summer.
We are zone 5b/6a. I generally go with zone 5 plants for hardiness, as I don’t want to lose plants or get partial dieback (as I do with Prime Jan blackberry) with those plants that are borderline.


#696

i had that problem in my strawberries last year. get some DE and dust your berries as they ripen . its edible so eating a little won’t hurt anything. don’t use during bloom as youll hurt the bees too. slugs hate it also. cuts them when they try to cross it. i put it in a large herb container and sift it on that way.


#697

Here we only have a few, I was thinking of using spinsad. Organic, fairly safe. It could help with SWD too. But is kills bees too, so probably not the best choice.


#698

I have a question about some volunteer peaches I’m planning to graft this spring. I need to move them, should I do that at the same time I graft, or wait a year?

These are growing in the garden in an area I smothered in compost and they grew extremely fast, almost 5’ tall in their first year from seed. Last year was my first try grafting peaches and I had 100% failure. I’m wondering if leaving them in place for a year would give me a better chance of a graft “take”.


#699

I am very anxious to see answers to your question, since I’m in exactly the same position. I grafted 8 volunteer peaches this year with an unknown tree that was on my property when I bought it and which I am madly in love with but it is quickly dying of old age. Like you, I’ve had absolutely zero success grafting peaches in the past, so I’ll be lucky if I get a single take. My volunteers are all under existing peach trees, which I read can be a good thing since it provides some shade/sun protection for the newly grafted trees. But I am really struggling on the issue of what to do if one of my grafts DO work. My seedlings were only about 2 foot tall from last years growth and I cut them off at about 3-4 inches this year to do my grafts. If any take, it seems like I should move them now before the roots get too big and set in place, but it also feels like if I move them now it would be adding to the stress on the new grafts before they are ready. ???

@alan I am sorry I missed your question when you posted it and just noticed it today, but I am very glad I did! My Ozark Premier is just on its third leaf and the first time it bloomed so I have never got any fruit. I, too, thought it was strange that it bloom so much earlier than my other Asian plums, and now with you telling me it isn’t known for that I am even more suspicious that I have a mislabeled tree. However, I have one big problem with that theory. I have planted a small, 12 tree orchard in a local city park, and there is an Ozark premier there too. Well, I bought it at a completely different store on a different year, and it blooms at exactly the same time as the one at my house. It is on 4th leaf but they got froze last year. I think I lost all the fruit on them both this year as well due to the early bloom…but there are still a few little stems with dead flowers hanging on and they could have a live, viable, tiny fruitlet inside…fingers crossed. I don’t want to try and pull the dead bloom off before shuck split or even try to peak inside for fear I’ll knock it off.

One other point…both of these trees certainly have the same look as all my plum trees. I have several apricot trees and I’m sure my Ozark premier is not an apricot. I’m not wise enough to look at a tree without fruit and say what KIND of plum it is, but I’m quite sure it is a plum tree (I suppose most pluots look the same though). Anyway, none of this helps confirm or deny much of anything. But I really appreciate you putting me on alert that I may have another surprise on my hands (or 2 including the one at City Park). I’ll keep you posted.


#700

Yes, it will. Another option is to move seedlings in early spring and bud them in summer, they will be well established by then.