Rubus Breeding

@staalmannen

Have had plants die in the past without preserving them. Had a pumpkin that could grow wild on its own producing many pumpkins. It died out when it was a kid likely due to me over harvesting that wild pumpkin. It was irreplaceable and still I look for something close. It was somewhat like Connecticut field pumpkin but 3x better. Made delicious pies. The wild pumpkin grew completely on its own if you left a few pumpkins. You have heard the saying nothing is irreplaceable well don’t believe it its not true. People and their plant materials are both completely irreplaceable. The people who are expert growers like Van Mons was to pears have never been duplicated. Etter apples are still mysterious. Much closer to home I can think of dozens of people who’s contributions are not remembered by most people but were incredibly important to my growing things. History is something I set a great store by because it impacts our future Question the History of a pear or know some history? Post it here! . Many don’t know who Crandall was or why his current is important but some here do. Outside of this forum few grow the Crandall current it gets more rare every day. Clove currants - great smelling blooms & delicious fruit! - #3 by clarkinks

You can see photos like this one of some clove currents I grow. There are many other people grow I find interesting

Highly recommend looking at @Drew51 crandall clove currents on this thread Clove currants - great smelling blooms & delicious fruit!
Maybe it’s the weather but my results are not that great but still pretty good. Drew may just have a little purer strain of crandall clove current. This is what my bushes look like










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I searched for years, and ended up requesting material from the US germplasm repository in Corvallis, Oregon. It took several tries over a few years to succeed propagating all three. I’ve never seen a nectar raspberry for sale in the US.

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That is awesome. I thought they only served organizations? Here in Europe, I have only found some nurseries with Heisa in Finland where you have to pick them up in person. While I am eager to have them is flying to Finland to pick one up a bit much. I have never found the other two for sale anywhere.

For future reference (if I manage to make some nice hybrids to share) - are there issues (soil hygiene rules etc) when sending live plant material between EU and US?

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I can take a look if I’ll find a company that sends Heisa inside the EU. My latest plant seemed to have a virus when I received it so I ditched it. So far Heisa is also the one strain that always gets winter killed for me.

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We got a new EU regulation a year ago. Sending any live plant material (seeds, cuttings) to the EU is now forbidden. The situation does suck quite a bit but luckily I had the time to aqcuire most of the genetics I thought I needed.

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@staalmannen @BerryAllen

In the USA the usda requires what is referred to as a phytosanitary certificate to import plant materials.

" What is a Phytosanitary Certificate?
A phytosanitary certificate is an official document that verifies a commodity has been inspected by an authorized official and found to be relatively free of pests and pathogens. The literal definition of “phytosanitary” is plant (phyto) free of elements that endanger health (sanitary) "

In addition to the certificate you would need an import/ export license USDA APHIS | Plants and Plant Products Permits

Specifically USDA APHIS | Controlled Import Permits

It’s not to say you can’t the question is how bad someone wants to because the paperwork , time, and costs are deterrents.

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Yeah that’s it. It might be easier said than done with privately shared stuff though. When I asked the customs here they said even the certificate isn’t enough and there should be a local company working as the middle hand. But you know bureaucrats, never a straight answer.

That said, I haven’t let that stop me from buying seed over seas. I won’t tell anyone to act like me but there’s little chance of letters getting caught in the customs. They’ve even opened my strawberry seed delivery and then just forwarded it to me. No problem.

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The problem becomes there are countries out there that might mean harm to another so they could send a pest in cheap seed to damage the food supply. Some eggs of whatever pest that attacks strawberries if your country is known for and makes their money from strawberries is very damaging.

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That’s the reasoning I guess. Transmission of disease from live plants is a much more likely scenario than from seeds though. We’ve been sending seeds overseas for hundreds of years already. I don’t know of any plague that got started that way. Invasive species though, that’s another thing completely.

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I see Gurney’s is selling a thornless black raspberry . Something new to consider for breeding perhaps . I wonder what its real name is ? They are calling it Born Free .

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$25 bucks a pop! Ouch!! Nothing “FREE” about that.

I’ll have to stick with my Thorns till the new wears off.

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Putting together a group order that will include the 4 Artic raspberries

Now is a great opportunity to get them at a reasonable price.

https://growingfruit.org/t/hartmann-plant-company-joint-order-spring-2022-rasberry-kiwi-lingon-blue-cranberries-units-of-1-or-2-possible/42152/23

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Monrovia is listing a thornless dwarf blackberry called Superlicious… aimed at patio growers. Not my thing but i see where it could be interesting. I think its a U of Ark release.

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wonder if this a is a renamed sport of Baby cakes. they are good blackberries but don’t put out much of a crop compared to full sized varieties. they play well in the garden as they rarely sucker more than a foot from the mother plant.

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I just saw in this article that R. spectabilis is much closer to R. arcticus than raspberries are:

I happen to have a spectabilis with rose-like petals (Olympic double). Might be interesting to try. In R. arcticus / raspberry hybrids is there an issue of low fertility the first generations, and the raspberry flavor is dominant. R. spectabilis is more bland so perhaps will that hybrid allow for more R. arcticus flavor.

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Wow, I see cloudberry is in a bracket all by itself. I guess there isn’t another Rubus quite like it. Another interesting observation is that the balloonberry shares a bracket with a plant with similar-looking fruit but that plant does not share the same hardiness zones.

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best to drag and drop the pdf into the forum. Prevents links from dieing
fpls-10-01615.pdf (2.1 MB)

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Indeed. When I managed to grow some plants from cloudberry seeds, I first thought they looked a lot like strawberry plants with the hairy stem and the reddish rhizomes.

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I found a cultivated dewberry plant (rubus caesius) growing near me so I took home some of the seeds as a curiosity, since it’s obviously z4 hardy.

I’m getting very high germination rates

One came up with three baby leaves.

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@jerry63 I saw that too, but thought it was a bit pricey considering I don’t actually need any more cane fruits.

I haven’t seen it sold elsewhere, so I’m guessing they have exclusive rights to sell it (retail at least).

It’s out of stock now.

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