Bill Whitman's south FL Pawpaw trial

“latitude” + “heat with humidity” + “soil in south FL”

2 Likes

So pawpaw can like or dislike heat+humidity based on soil type? I thought they preferred alot of heat+humidity regardless of any other factor.

BTW beautiful orchard!

I didn’t say that, but perhaps someone else did.

My attempts at stimulating rooting in Asimina triloba, via Cytokinin catalysts, has resulting in BLOOMING on multiple cultivars,
even in air laying in Tucson in August!
No roots yet, but stimulating blooming on Asimina triloba, even during heat, is rather easy.

1 Like

It’s a Magnoliid

What’s this have to do with Bill Whitman’s trial?

Responding to:
“Most of what you have read about needed chill hours in pawpaws is simply wrong. There are a lot of myths that have grown up about pawpaws that are simply not fact. There has long been a myth that you can’t grow pawpaws in zone 9 at all no matter how many chill hours you get.”

  1. Most Annonaceae don’t require chill hours.
  2. The Asimina triloba did a summer bloom, no chill.
  3. Pawpaw can tolerate temperature 20 degrees hotter than Florida.
  4. Whitman’s difficulties could have been due to unknown factors, rather than the assumed factors listed.
  5. Asimina triloba’s extreme resistance to rooting from branches even under what is normally perfect conditions is evidence that the species is not understood very well.
2 Likes

No but my question is why didn’t he succeed?
Your reply
“latitude” + “heat with humidity” + “soil in south FL”

Heat with humidity is not a problem in Jacksonville Fl , where humidity rivals new Orleans every year on top stop for humidity. Miami has almost same humidity on daily averages as Seattle and Portland. Pawpaw grows well in Seattle and Portland so we know humidity without the heat is not a problem. Like i said i can see soil types and latitude playing a part not heat with humidity. Am i missing something? My theory is just like long island gets to much wind for pawpaw,so does south Florida. One hurricane could destroy an orchard.

But it could be “latitude” + “heat with humidity” + “soil in south FL” like you said. I guess my brain cant grasp what your saying.

I agree

1 Like

@FloridaFrugivoreFami,
Asimina triloba reminds me of truffles in some ways, which have declined by over 99% over the last 100 years due to reduction of habitat, despite their astronomical value & claimed scientific knowledge about the species.
Why, because with all we know, we can’t synthetically reproduce their habitat & grow them commercially!
The inability to clone, air layer, tissue culture, cutting propagate, etc, screams that we don’t understand their preferred rooting environment.
That most likely is the reason for Bill Whitman’s failure, not the temperature, nor the humidity.
My hypothesis is that his high knowledge level was what helped contribute to his failure by causing him to do something to insure the plants success which unwittingly resulted in the pawpaw’s demise.

1 Like

I would have to say I agree! Maybe soil down there but not heat and humidity. Makes no sense for a tree that thrives in Kentucky to not like heat and humidity , unless its at the right latitude and soil type I guess.The smartest people I know, usually know the least. Too much time reading someone elses work without real world experience. For years scientists told us the smallest particle in the universe was an atom. Now we find out the closer you zoom in the farther apart it gets until theres nothing but oscillating light. Everything is really just light vibrating at a different frequency giving the illusion of individuality. So anything is possible! Im growing things here in 8b that everyone and everbook says is pretty much impossible!

1 Like

They are doing well in Tucson, even though 114 days per year above 100°F.
8% to 14% humidity most of the year, but 70% during summer monsoons.
The pawpaw here actually look far healthier than KSU.

2 Likes

WOW thats amazing and proof that trial and error is much better what a book or a rumor on the internet says! Thank you for sharing. I would’ve never imagined they could thrive in Tucson!

1 Like