Morris Burton growing well

A few years back I bought a larger Fuyu persimmon tree in hopes that it would produce fruit faster. I took a lot of care in digging a large hole for it and watered whenever it was needed. This tree struggled from winter dieback and just growing slowly however it did survive. After we moved I was given a small Morris Burton persimmon from a friend. The tree was in the best condition of any I have ever had for planting. Good root system without being rootbound. I have a tradition of letting my grands plant a tree and they get a name tag to go with it (Lily’s Morris Burton). My youngest five year old grand Lily and I prepared the hole and took a lot of care spreading the roots out. Fast forward and this persimmon is growing very well and has doubled in size. Every time Lily visits she wants to go see how her tree is doing so we tour the orchard. Never underestimate the value of letting children help with your fruit trees. Thanks @Barkslip

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Yes sir. You are welcome.

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@Auburn Bill,
My 2nd year MB graft flowered this year but all the fruit dropped!

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It was grafted on a small JT2 tree. JT2 still is hanging on to a couple of flowers but I won’t be surprised if they all drop, too.

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I think you will have a better fruits set with a male American branch graft right next to it.

Tony,
Do you have male American persimmon you can spare me a stick, pls?

You can remind me next February before I move.

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Thank you. I will.

I would love to move to one of those lots to be your neighbor but tornado threats and fluctuating weather (rather extreme) you have there makes me pause!!

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@mamuang , @tonyOmahaz5
I’m learning that persimmons don’t easily give you fruit the first few years. I would have liked to have seen pictures of the fruit. My little Morris Burton doubled in size and looks healthy. I notice a wild seedling in my shrubs but I don’t know if it is male. When my tree gets larger I will also add a male limb.

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Bill,
I think a lack of male persimmon is the reason my Nikita’s and other persimmons like Morris have difficulty hold on to their fruit.

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Hi Mamung,
About 10 years ago someone (Bennylafluer) posted this on Houz; “ I seem to have a different experience here than other people growing Virginiana. The native here are 60 chromosome, I have not intentionally planted a 90 chromosome male, and the following have been seedless for me. Prok, Evelyn, Yates, MB3, Morris Burton, Geneva Red, Elmo, H-118, Killen, and J-20A.” This would indicate that his trees were producing well and holding fruit without males nearby. This is one of the reasons I wanted to know if there may be a way to know if some of the Houz posters may have migrated over to this website. I have tried to locate Benny but had no success. Facebook is full of this name but no one talking about fruit.
Dennis
Kent, wa

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I think there was a link to a paper on here previously about southern male persimmon being used to “pollinate” northern improved varieties to get seedless fruit. But, there are also reports of the seeded fruit being bigger and better tasting. If a person is using a processor, the seeds don’t matter so much anyway I guess. Biologically, I’m not sure why a tree would want to spend any energy on trying to grow fruit to make offspring if the fruit doesn’t have viable seeds. Just abort and try again next year.

I found that paper:
Ploidy Level in American Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) Cultivars

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Thanks John,
It’s a well written paper as well as informative. I was born and raised in West Tn where we had lots of persimmon on our cotton farm. Here in Kent, where I reside, they do not naturally exist. I am in the process of researching the ripening potential for various varieties. It’s been an interesting study. From what I have determined so far the natic3 persimmons may actually ripen earlier than Asians in general. I have only Asian varieties here but ripening is a challenge, thus my need to se what works in other similar climates of short cool growing seasons. I am beginning to think that the native persimmon may be the best bet for me, although several hybrids may be even better. Anyway appreciate your article
Dennis
Kent, Wa

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They sure seem to like heat for sure! I hope you can find a good variety that works well for you.

According to Blue Hill Wildlife Nursery
POLLINATION
Morris Burton persimmon tree is self fruitful and will produce seedless fruit without pollination through parthenocarpy (the development of a fruit without prior fertilization). If you’re wishing to have seeded fruit, I would recommend planting at least 3 of our cold hardy, highly vigorous seedlings in your Persimmons orchard.

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According to Diospyros virginiana 'Morris Burton' (Morris Burton Common Persimmon) | North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox
Description
Morris Burton is a native, small to medium-sized tree which is partially self-fertile as it produces some male flowers. Best fruiting occurs with a male and female tree being planted together. The orange-red fruits have excellent flavor and are considered one of the best native persimmons. It can be slow to fruit.

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Each group has different opinions on pollination for Morris Burton.

According to Chestnut Hill Outdoors
Pollination Requires Pollinator. Plant at LEAST two trees for pollination; however, each additional tree will increase pollination for better mast production

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So Bill,
This spring I obtained and grafted a native Catawba to my chocolate persimmon. So far the grafts appear to be taking. The fellow I got the scions from is not certain if they need a pollinator but claims that it is a native variety that was cultivated by the Catawba Tribe. The fruit pictures he provided are impressive. My guess is that I will need to add a pollinator, so I am hoping that adding a Morris Burton graft near the top of the tree would be a good choice, assuming I can locate scionwood. What would you think?
Dennis
Kent, Wa

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I don’t have much experience with persimmons but your plan sounds good. I would be happy to send you scionwood from my Morris Burton but it is too small right now. Looking to let it grow another two years before removing scions unless the growth is in an undesired spot.

Thanks Bill,
I appreciate your opinion!
You probably have more experience than I, I agree only a somewhat mature tree is good for scions where you need to thin or tip prune. Good luck with it though!

I have time to shop. Probably can get it from England’s Orchard if he gets recovered from winter ice storm damage.
Take care

Dennis

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Morris Burton appears to be holding fruit. Keeping fingers crossed. I have no American pollinators -only Asian.

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